Spring 2016

February

Friday Evening Lecture

Spectral Visitors: The Mystery of Dreams and Their use in the Conduct of Life

Date:               February 5, 2016 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Presenter:        James Hollis, Ph.D., IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,
                        Inwood at Mockingbird
$20.00 non-members (wine and cheese reception)

Why do we dream, and what meaning might our dreams provide us? 

How did Freud view dreams, and how did Jung differ?  What are the ways in which we might begin to remember our dreams, and work to integrate their messages to us?   Illustrations of the various kinds of dreams are provided.

Saturday Workshop

Working with Dreams
Date:              
February 6, 2016 9:30 a.m.– noon

Presenter:        James Hollis, Ph.D., IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,
                        Inwood at Mockingbird
$40.00 non-members (coffee and rolls provided)

Together we will discern the structure of dreams and the means of opening their stories to enlarge our journey. We will then practice with the dreams of people like us in order to become more comfortable working with our personal material.  (Please bring a pen.)

James Hollis, Ph. D., is a Jungian analyst in practice in Washington D. C. where he is also Executive Director of the Jung Society of Washington and author of fourteen books, the most recent being What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life and Hauntings: Dispelling the Ghosts Who Run Our Lives.

 


 

 

March

Friday Evening Lecture

Dreams and the Eclipse of God: How Personal Complexes and Personal Meaning Often Silence the Archetypal Message in Dreams and Life

Date:               March 11, 2016  7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Presenter:        Michael Conforti, Ph.D., IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,

                        Inwood at Mockingbird
$20.00 non-members (wine and cheese reception)

“To pray is to dream in league with God,” says Abraham  Heschel. We long for and are terrified to hear the voice of God; there is an all-too-human need to silence this voice.

Our collective, modern approach to dreams captures this eternal struggle to listen to and act in accordance with the wisdom of the Psyche, and, on the other hand, to deny these messages. Often the dream’s archetypal meaning is eclipsed by our personal complexes and reactions to it, thus rendering secular and profane that which is actually sacred and eternal.

This lecture will address the relationship between the archetypal and the personal meaning of dream images and the symbolic representation of archetypal and personal complexes in dreams and our associations to them. Dreams from clinical practice, the Bible, and historical figures will illustrate this theme.

Saturday Workshop

How Personal Complexes and Personal Meaning Often Silence the Archetypal Message in Dreams and Life: Workshop 

Date:               March 12, 2016  9:30 a.m.– noon

Presenter:        Michael Conforti, Ph.D., IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,
                        Inwood at Mockingbird
$40.00 non-members (coffee and rolls provided)

Dr Conforti will weave theory and dream work to illustrate the vitality and spiritual nature of dreams. So too, participants will recognize the need to learn the unique language of the dream and the meaning of the universal motifs and images found in dreams, as they teach us about the antique soul. Dreams will be presented to illustrate these themes:

¨ Dreams and the Voice of God

¨ The archetypal nature of dream

¨ Learning to see the relationship and difference between the archetypal images inherent in a dream and the  personal complexes the dream triggers within the dreamer.

Dr. Michael Conforti, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst, author, and founder/director of the Assisi Institute. His discoveries have resulted in a new discipline: Archetypal Pattern Analysis. Dr. Conforti investigates the workings of archetypal fields and the relationship between Jungian psychology and the New Sciences. He lectures and consults internationally and served as script consultant on the film Pride and Glory. He authored Field, Form, and Fate: Patterns in Mind, Nature & Psyche; Threshold Experiences: The Archetype of Beginnings; and the forthcoming Hidden Presence: Complexes, Possessions, and Redemption.


 

April

Friday Evening Lecture

The Redemption of What Truly Matters: The Paradox of Suffering 

Date:               April 8, 2016 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Presenter:        Carol Tripp Smith , LPC, IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,

                        Inwood at Mockingbird
$20.00 non-members (wine and cheese reception)

“The development of consciousness is the burden, the suffering, and the blessing of mankind,” says C. G. Jung. While we don’t generally think of it as a blessing, we all encounter suffering as inherent to being alive. This lecture will explore the experience of suffering through story, poetry, philosophy, and an overall Jungian lens. The overarching theme will be an invitation to embrace our brokenness rather than attempt to avoid suffering in ways that invite inevitable disappointment.    

Saturday Workshop

Re-envisioning Suffering

Date:               April 9, 2016 9:30 – noon

Presenter:        Carol Tripp Smith, LPC, IAAP.

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,
                        Inwood at Mockingbird

$40.00 non-members (coffee and rolls provided)

W. H. Auden writes, “We would rather be ruined than changed. We would rather die in our dread than climb the cross of the moment and see our illusions die.” How might we re-envision suffering in a way that brings change and diminishes angst? Through discussion and experiential exercises, we will consider ways we might face suffering in a manner that over time may foster further psychological growth. Please bring paper and pen for this process.

Carol Tripp Smith, LPC, IAAP, is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Oklahoma City. She has been a psychotherapist for 23 years, is a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute, Zürich, and currently serves as Acting Director of Training of the Jung Institute of Dallas


 

May

Friday Evening Lecture

The City as Soul 

Date:               May 13, 2016 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Presenter:        Ron Schenk, Ph.D., LCSW, LPC, IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,

                        Inwood at Mockingbird
$20.00 non-members (wine and cheese reception)

The notion of anima mundi, which Jung borrowed from alchemy, posits a life force belonging to the world itself. Expanding this notion, we would say every place, thing, event, and relational grouping–natural or man-made–has its own life apart from human involvement. Cities themselves, then, would be seen as each ensouled in a particular way. This lecture will explore the life of the “city in itself,” examining how cities carry life and death, sickness and health, memory and future vision for the collective psyche.      

Saturday Workshop

The Soul’s Journey

Date:               May 14 2016 9:30 – noon

Presenter:        Ron Schenk, Ph.D., LCSW, LPC, IAAP

Location:         St. Thomas Episcopal Church,
                        Inwood at Mockingbird

$40.00 non-members (coffee and rolls provided)

Gnostic myth tells of the soul’s journey to self revelation. On this journey, several themes are evoked–Awakening, Attachment, Departure, Crossing Over, Yearning, Guide, Goal, Working Through, Sacrifice, Release, and Atonement. This workshop will present “The Soul’s Journey” in multi-media form: psychological narrative, selections from T.S. Eliot’s “The Four Quartets,” live singing of arias and art songs, and a dynamic presentation of images and videos mainly from the alchemical text Splendor Solis, depicting the way of the pilgrim.

Ronald Schenk, Ph.D., LCSW, LPC, trained in Jungian analysis with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts and has served as senior training analyst and president of the Society. He practices and teaches in Dallas and Houston. He is the author of four books, most recently American Soul: A Cultural Narrative.